Your Secret

One winter day in 2004, on the streets of Washington, D.C., he randomly handed out 3,000 self-addressed postcards with some simple instructions. Frank Warren asked passersby to share anonymously a secret they’d never told. The idea went viral and his suburban mailbox became a confessional for all sorts of postcards from not only D.C. but all corners of the world: Texas, California, Vancouver, New Zealand, Iraq. He reads every divulgence before putting some up on his site postsecret.com and saving the rest for his books. Frank rubber-bands the postcards into bricks that weigh up to three pounds and has stacked over half a million secrets into giant brick pyramids in his basement.

Why do we share secrets? I’ve thought that in the case of confessions of wrongs, it might serve as an act of atonement. But then again, murderers who step into the light usually aren’t looking to atone. Coming out, letting in. Is the reach ultimate evidence that as social creatures our need for connection trumps the loneliness of shame or the safe privacy of a truth?

National Public Radio:

WARREN: Secrets can remind us of the countless human dramas, of frailty and heroism, playing out silently in the lives of people all around us, even now. What I’d like to do now is share with you a very special handful of secrets from that collection, starting with this one.

(Reading)

~ Everyone who knew me before 9/11 believes I’m dead.

~ That Saturday, when you wondered where I was, well, I was getting your ring. It’s in my pocket right now.

~ This one looks like a cut-out of a page from a children’s book.

RAZ: “The Giving Tree,” actually.

WARREN: “The Giving Tree.”

I had an abortion, and to this day, I wonder if my baby forgives me.

RAZ: You know what’s interesting looking at, like, all these postcards that you get, is that you would never see this kind of stuff on Facebook, right…because we’re conditioned to put this facade forward, right – like, this thing that is only part of who we are.

WARREN: Yeah, PostSecret is kind of like the anti-Facebook. One of the saddest things I’ve learned in this project is how, in many ways, the secrets that we’re keeping aren’t the greatest burden. They’re not the ones constricting and restricting us. It’s all the energy that we put into concealing them, the walls and barriers we develop between not just us and other people, but who we are and who we accept about who we are. And so for me, I think it’s great to see somebody share a secret and see that feeling of not just letting the secret out, but also, all that guardedness, all the defensives that were installed to protect that secret.

HOLISTIC WAYFARER: So…have a secret you want to share with me? Serial killing will probably prove too much for me but other than that, I can play confidante. Here’s the anonymous link. Comments closed.